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20121104
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to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
compromise won't trust science, won't work at all. we're seeing that. so i believe there will be a change in our recent cross the aisle. i did before. we can do that. i come from a republican family. the problem is we have a very right-wing group in washington right now that will not compromise. >> moderator: mr. guinta, one minute. guinta: first, she blames the tea party. i'm undergoing different tv station she found herself agreeing with the tea party and says she agrees with many principles of the tea party, so you can't have it both ways. secondly, the freshman class was elected around the country because the congress who served in the spending and borrowing out of control and passing legislation that the country didn't want. the countries that enough in 2010. so here's always done in the house. firstly we did was cut her own budgets. the second day we did was vote to repeal the affordable carrots, something the country wanted us to do. the third thing was stop earmarks. the fourth thing we did was freeze congressional pay. and then went into the bipartisan work with more than dirty d
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
are making a big effort to apply science to this redeployment. um, when will you have completed the agreements with the stans, the central asian republics? >> there are some treaty sensitivities there, clearly, but i am confident that by the end of this year or early next year that will be delivered. >> right. um, and do you think norton will be able to cope with the withdrawal? >> yes, i do. there's work going on in prize norton, but it's also about ports of entry as well as airports of entry. so this is a national effort in terms of the site of this. what i do is make sure that the redeployment of equipment will not in any way hinder the military operation that equipment is supposed to support. so there's an equilibrium here about supporting transition right through to 2013 and the end which you've heard us describe and how much equipment we can take out. and that's a fine balance which we address and scrutinize on a regular basis. >> so if norton is not itself going to be i pose one would call it -- i suppose one would call it a pinch point or something, are there any other b
in washington, d.c.. he received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from the universities of cairo, and masters of international law from the university of paris, and this is quite fitting because in the arab world with one out of three of all arabs being egyptians, egyptians have participated in and leading representatives in international organizations in more than any other country in the arab world, and, indeed, one egyptian became the secretary general of the united nations. please join me in welcoming mohamed taufik. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. i'd like to start by thanking dr. anthony for your kind introduction and kind invitation for me to be here today. particularly, i'd li to thank you fo the fantastork you an the council have be doing to promote relations between the ited states and the ash world. these relations are vital f the interest of both paies, and i look forward to continue to cooperation and continued efforts to promote these relations. i feel i have a special role being the first ambassador of egypt after the revolution to the united states. it's a
don't know whether that's because of how computer science is conducted in universities or, you know, i'm not with larry summers. i think it's also showed and not physical. but on the other financial literacy, we didn't address that here because were only looking at earnings and not as income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets and that includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts in stocks and bonds, all financial assets, which is to say every asset in the economy except homes, art and gold or whatever are held by the top 20% of the country. the bottom 80% control 70% of the value of all financial assets. so, that financial literacy in the top 20% and probably does have an effect on income
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
that this is not a science. so and of this work it wasn't mathematical. it is in part. and you'll have people disagreeing come even within the agency, about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. you give it to one person and for sample in the fbi, the report, and we would get a very significant reduction. would give it to another person, much less significant redactions and they would argue with each other as what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with a broad strokes, redacted all sorts of information from the report, that they need to justify why would harm national security, which is the standard after all. by pushing back we often got much information out in the public that it turned out wasn't able to be released into the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. and maybe that thing with any agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government. because you know w
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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